Linux "Get a Mac"Spoof Videos

These are pretty funny..

Novell releases Get a Mac spoofs

The first video plays off the Win/Mac rivalry and pokes fun at how the industry often ignores Linux and its surprising (to some) user base size. The second video is arguably funnier, as it does a great job of poking fun at the way MS and Apple market their products while pointing out open source software’s advantage of being a community effort. [digg – tech news / apple / dig]

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Agile Chronicles Blog: A few good managers

This is awesome..

Development: “You want answers?”
Marketing: “I think we are entitled to them!”
Development: “You want answers?!”
Marketing: “I want the truth!”
Development: “You can’t handle the truth!!!

Son, we live in a world that requires software. And that software must be built by people with elite skills. Who’s going to build it? You, Mr. Marketing? You, Mr. Sales? You, Mr. Finance? You, Mr. Human Resources? I don’t think so.

Agile Chronicles: A Few Good Managers

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On the topic of assertions

Every assertion should be thought from the standpoint of

  1. What was expected
  2. What actually happened

Translation: assertTrue should always, always have a message.

Consider the following:

assertTrue(mv.getViewName()
    .startsWith(myController.getSuccessView()));

This will only return “assertion failed”. Which is great, but how do we know what happened? If this is buried on one of the lunt automated remote builds, how am I supposed to know what is going wrong? Which is the expected? What actually happened?

A much better version of the same looks like this:

assertTrue(
    "Was expecting something like "
        + myController.getSuccessView() + " but was "
        + mv.getViewName(),
    mv.getViewName()
        .startsWith(myController.getSuccessView()));

Same assertion, but now it tells me more specifically what’s going on and I can fix bugs with it. Once I set this on the test, it becomes easy to see what was going on.

I recently had a Saturday with some other Bay Area developers where we did a lot of thinking about testing, so expect some more advice in the future as I collect my notes.

Remember the goal of unit tests is to “find bugs” (thanks Harry!). An assertion without an associated message merely notifies you that a bug occurred but doesn’t actually “find it”. As you are writing your unit tests, make sure you find it as well.

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