Using the Bluetooth keyboard under the iPad

Well, I mentioned I’d attach a bluetooth keyboard to the iPad to try it out and that’s exactly what I did. The results are better than with the regular keyboard but still not ideal.

Of course typing with a real keyboard is going to feel great. The problem is that it’s just field typing. On most of the apps, tabs don’t work to move from field to field, and the PageUp/PageDown keys on the small apple bluetooth keyboard (Fn and Up/Down) are not wired in at all.

All the media function keys, however (from the brightness controls of F1&2 to the media and volume controls on F7 through F12) work fine. Which underscores the idea that this is a media consumption device more than a production device.

FuzzyCom :: Using DTrace for javascript debug on OS X in firefox

Vincent Hellot over at FuzzyCom teaches how to use dtrace to trace javascript problems on a Mac (using a specially compiled Firefox binary for OSX). He hints at being able to do it with Ruby on Rails as well. Haven’t tried this, but can’t wait to do so.

This post aims at introducing the DTrace debugging tool in the scope of a javascript application. It won’t get too deep in the wide field of DTrace functions but I hope it will give you an overview of how DTrace can help to solve performance and debugging issues in your javascript applications

[From FuzzyCom :: Using DTrace for javascript debug on OS X in firefox]

Ruby Appscript – Sweet automation

Yesterday a coworker pointed me to ruby’s appscript. I have found it nothing short of amazing.

I love my Mac, and many of us like the idea of automating our software, until we try to use AppleScript to do it. To say that Applescript is professional developer unfriendly is an understatement. I like ruby but to make ruby and applescript talk requires sending strings to osascript in just the right way and getting the output from osascript back. Not a lot of fun at all.

Enter appscript. Appscript is a ruby library that interfaces with applescript seamlessly.

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Quick and stupid: Don't set unlimited on the buffer size of Terminal

If you’re a developer and use Terminal.app, don’t set “unlimited” on the buffer size. After a day of using it heavily to review logs and whatnot your computer will be *really* slow. It’s Terminal.app keeping in RAM what you did yesterday. Stupid and Obvious, but still figured I’d write it down.

Bindings, Outlets, Target+Action across multiple NIBs

I’m a total troublemaker. For my first Core Data app I decided to do something nontrivial (multiple windows referring to a single document). Of course nontrivial means that the Interface Builder can only help me so far. So now I’m stuck trying to get things to work out right. Luckily Patrick Geiller has put together a good explanation of how you can share multiple nibs across an application. Now all I have to do is apply this same data sharing technique to the NSDocument instead.

When using multiple NIBs, we need a common object that will share data among them. That object will hold bindings, outlets, target/action shared across NIBs.

[From Bindings, Outlets, Target+Action across multiple NIBs ]

Creating a Git project for XCode/Cocoa apps

You can always count on somebody to have figured things out before you.. Chrisopher Roach’s blog has a nice quick setup guide to get your xcode project in a git repo (gitignores, attributes and basic git push capability).

Whenever I setup a new Xcode project, the first thing I do is initialize it as a Git repository and add some configuration to the project that will make using Git with Xcode a bit less messy.

[From christopherroach.com ]

And of course debate has already started on the merits of treating certain things as binary to avoid merging nightmares. <sarcasm>Don’t you love XML syntaxes?</sarcasm>

Ruby, Folder actions and full automation

I routinely scan my documents as PDFs so I can keep them in a virtual filing cabinet (you know, the whole “paperless office” thing). I use my HP all-in-one software running on a Windows VM inside a Mac (sorry, but the Mac scanning software on HP is complete garbage in my opinion).

What bothered me about this was that all the files scanned always end up named “scan12345.pdf”. Because of the way I file, I like having my things as “year/company/year-monty-date.pdf” instead.

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