DeveloperWorks: Automate acceptance tests with Selenium

In this article, the author shows architects, developers, and testers how to use the Selenium testing tools to automate acceptance tests; automating the tests saves times and helps eliminate tester mistakes. You also are provided with an example of how to apply Selenium in a real-world project using Ruby on Rails and Ajax.

Automate acceptance tests with Selenium

I am using selenium in a project now (test runner mode while I get used to it) and I really like it.

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Eckel on Java vs Rails: The departure of the hyper-enthusiasts

As always Bruce Eckel is a great read..


The Java hyper-enthusiasts have left the building, leaving a significant contingent of Java programmers behind, blinking in the bright lights without the constant drumbeat of boosterism.

But the majority of programmers, who have been relatively quiet all this time, always knew that Java is a combination of strengths and weaknesses. These folks are not left with any feelings of surprise, but instead they welcome the silence, because it’s easier to think and work….

Clearly Ruby is making important contributions to the programming world. I think we’re seeing the effects sooner in Python than elsewhere, but I suspect it will have an effect on Java as well, eventually, if only in the web-framework aspects. Java-on-rails might actually tempt me into creating a web app using Java again.However, I can’t see Ruby, or anything other than C#, impacting the direction of the Java language, because of the way things have always happened in the Java world. And I think the direction that C# 3.0 may be too forward-thinking for Java to catch up to.

Weblogs Forum – The departure of the hyper-enthusiasts

Mainly, I think a pragmatic approach to a language is to assign value based on a) what you can accomplish with it, and b) how easy it is to write in the first place and maintain in the long run. So far Ruby is starting to become interesting on (a) – it was always interesting on (b) -, although we still have to do a lot of stuff in Java if we want to take advantage of a lot of features.

However, in Java there has been a lot of work already done to get you libraries and automated tools. I have been looking for some good IDEs for Ruby and I can’t seem to find anything that is better than just using vim (I’ve looked, but that’s another story) – Eclipse is my yardstick for comparison.

That means that I may want to switch to rails for web app development and maybe scripting, but not for any type of development where I have to apply deep pattern thinking and where I anticipate refactorings to come along as the system grows. It may be easier conceptually to do refactoring in Ruby, but that fact is superceded by the automatedness of doing it in Eclipse. It doesn’t matter if it impacts a lot more files to, say change a member variable name in a domain object, in Java vs. Ruby if I can do it with Alt-R in Eclipse and in Ruby I have to go and change it manually – the masses will not switch until you give them this kind of capability.

On the other hand, I really do like the fact that you can get started in ruby from scratch in a few minutes using things like “gem install rails”, vs. setting up a giant ant/java/spring/hibernate/tomcat on the java side.

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Tutor de Rails en Español

De mi tutor de Rails en Español:

Este curso pretende proporcionar al usuario información suficiente para hacer aplicaciones de web profesionales utilizando Ruby on Rails. Está enfocado a personas que ya sepan algo de programación en otros lenguajes, lo cual quiere decir que durante el curso haré referencia a conceptos y librerías familiares a usuarios de otros lenguajes y productos.

Tutor de Ruby on Rails

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The sad state of Mac OS X Photo Management Software

I gave iPhoto an honest try, and I’m going back to Picasa on the PC for managing my photos.. iPhoto is just a ridiculously bloated, silly excuse for a photo management program, especially when you have a very large library. It has been acting up ever since I got it and things have not gotten better.

Is there alternative photo organizer software for OS X? iPhoto is driving me nuts. I’m not interested in anything that costs money — just a reliable free download that will organize and display photos. Thanks.

iPhoto Alternatives?? | Ask MetaFilter

I may give some of these programs mentioned in the link a try – I installed Lightbox. It’s plenty fast, but it struck me more as a RAW camera conversion software that “grew” into a photo management program. The problem is that it can’t do simple things like rotating the pictures with the keyboard.

I’ll probably try iView when I get a chance. But Picasa is free, so shelling out $40 for something that is better on the PC side for free makes me feel like a fool. What I wish for is Picasa for the Mac :-) Maybe when I upgrade my OS I will try iPhoto again, because I really don’t want to stay on the PC.

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Beginner's AJAX Advice: Learn CSS First!

Sometimes the best advice is sitting in comments…

**Ajax is not a substitute for good style construction.** If you want a DIV to change 19 different styles when you do something to it, write a small, intelligent set of CSS classes that govern the changeable vs. unchangeable styles and use JS to add or subtract from the className property, instead of trying to make the code figure out the 14 out of 19 things that need to change.

Ajax should be mostly about behavior, and leave most visual look & feel to CSS techniques. Gee, that sounds familiar … I think the same thing was once said about something called HTML. 😉

If you’re not well-versed in CSS (real cascading techniques, not just using the syntax here & there) then stop developing and take the time to learn before going any further.

Ajax : Ajax Mistakes – SWiK (Comment)

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